The time has come... but I'm afraid.

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The time has come... but I'm afraid.

Postby frozencow » Mon Jul 28, 2014 9:10 pm

I awoke last Monday with an unforgiving itch located between my odd ears. Yes, they are odd - one is actually different to the other - and no, I hadn't forgotten to take a bath. The itch was a result of my yearning for change. I've reached the ripe old age of twenty, and though many of you may be thinking, "What does this have to do with Linux?" I shall try my utmost to explain in the hope that my query be solved. You see, I've always used Windows - not only those which we tend to find on walls that act as fragile barriers to the outside world, but equally the Windows we tend to encounter on computers.
Truth be told, I'm scared - petrified even. I want to make the switch, but I'm afraid. I wonder to myself, "Will I be able to do the things I am so accustomed to on Linux?". What I fear most is, "Will Linux be able to handle the things I don't tend to see on Windows?" "How will it protect my computer from the myriad of computer viruses, spyware, etc?" "How will switching to Linux aid my desire to create computer programmes?".
In retrospect, I know the answers to most of these questions, but just like a child who has happened to 'see' a monster underneath his/her bed, I need some reassurance - can I live without a window?
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Postby Ram » Mon Jul 28, 2014 11:18 pm

Well it's dark outside and my windows to the world are covered by curtains. I'm not afraid.

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Re: The time has come... but I'm afraid.

Postby Dutch_Master » Tue Jul 29, 2014 2:58 am

frozencow wrote: can I live without a window?
The answer is yes. Your new heaven is the command line interface. But we Linux'ers like things easy, so we say cli instead ;)

Linux can do anything any other OS can, and more, but it might do it slightly differently. In fact, it does a lot differently, especially 'under the hood'. The first thing you need to get your head round is "Linux is NOT Win-OS!" It's not a major thing, just remember that some stuff is done differently to what you've known so far. The second thing is the concept of software repositories. In essence, an online warehouse of applications, tools and essential stuff you can freely pick and choose from. Your "shopping list" is handled by a package manager. That checks if the tool/application you've selected needs additional packages to work and if so, automagically selects those for installation too. The clever thing is, if that tool need a certain piece of code, and it's already there because another tool also needs that code, it's not downloaded again, the new tool just links to the existing code. Saves a lot of space, try that on XP, Win7/8/whatever ;)

You said you want to do programming/coding: well linux is excellently equipped for that. It has a range of IDE's, colour-coded text-editors, debug-tools and for pretty much any programming language you may want to use. Viruses and malware aren't an issue for Linux (yet!!) but it can carry infected data to a(ny) Win-OS systems it connects to. Again, Linux offers tools to increase your security and the integrity of your machines (rootkits!)

My advise: try cheap, use Raspberry Pi. Runs from SD card, aimed at new, young, computer programmers and thus loaded with educational tools for just that: teaching newbee's the ropes in computer programming. But it's also a cheap IDE of sorts for those who are a bit more advanced and the community is ever increasing, in numbers and resources. If you c*ck up and bork your Linux install, just re-flash the SD card and away you go again :)

Hope that's the last of your nightmares gone :mrgreen:
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Postby lok1950 » Tue Jul 29, 2014 5:17 am

Or you can dual-boot :shock: as I do my Win side is for development of cross-platform projects for which I try to keep the tool chain the same on both sides of the domain as almost all of my favourite Linux tools are available for Windows :D

Enjoy the Choice :)
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Postby towy71 » Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:15 am

I have helped quite a few people put Linux in their computers, some dual booting others just having Linux, the latter seem to have fewer problems ;-)
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Re: The time has come... but I'm afraid.

Postby frozencow » Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:11 pm

Dutch_Master wrote:
frozencow wrote: can I live without a window?
The answer is yes. Your new heaven is the command line interface. But we Linux'ers like things easy, so we say cli instead ;)

Linux can do anything any other OS can, and more, but it might do it slightly differently. In fact, it does a lot differently, especially 'under the hood'. The first thing you need to get your head round is "Linux is NOT Win-OS!" It's not a major thing, just remember that some stuff is done differently to what you've known so far. The second thing is the concept of software repositories. In essence, an online warehouse of applications, tools and essential stuff you can freely pick and choose from. Your "shopping list" is handled by a package manager. That checks if the tool/application you've selected needs additional packages to work and if so, automagically selects those for installation too. The clever thing is, if that tool need a certain piece of code, and it's already there because another tool also needs that code, it's not downloaded again, the new tool just links to the existing code. Saves a lot of space, try that on XP, Win7/8/whatever ;)

You said you want to do programming/coding: well linux is excellently equipped for that. It has a range of IDE's, colour-coded text-editors, debug-tools and for pretty much any programming language you may want to use. Viruses and malware aren't an issue for Linux (yet!!) but it can carry infected data to a(ny) Win-OS systems it connects to. Again, Linux offers tools to increase your security and the integrity of your machines (rootkits!)

My advise: try cheap, use Raspberry Pi. Runs from SD card, aimed at new, young, computer programmers and thus loaded with educational tools for just that: teaching newbee's the ropes in computer programming. But it's also a cheap IDE of sorts for those who are a bit more advanced and the community is ever increasing, in numbers and resources. If you c*ck up and bork your Linux install, just re-flash the SD card and away you go again :)

Hope that's the last of your nightmares gone :mrgreen:


I'll be sleeping extremely well tonight! :lol:

I will definitely take this advice on board. How much do you reckon I could purchase a Raspberry Pi kit for AND have you any advice on which kit I should get?
I am considering in installing Ubuntu, as I downloaded it onto an USB and tried it on my laptop. It worked an absolute treat, and I fell in love with the interface. :D


Well it's dark outside and my windows to the world are covered by curtains. I'm not afraid.


I have blinds you see - the light still seeps through. I am batman. :twisted:

Or you can dual-boot Shocked as I do my Win side is for development of cross-platform projects for which I try to keep the tool chain the same on both sides of the domain as almost all of my favourite Linux tools are available for Windows Very Happy

Enjoy the Choice Smile


That sounds like a good idea! I personally own three computers, would it be worth dual-booting? Or should I have a computer dedicated to a Linux OS?

I have helped quite a few people put Linux in their computers, some dual booting others just having Linux, the latter seem to have fewer problems Wink


Exactly why I would simply make the full switch. I've never liked 50/50 bread - either give me wholemeal or white! No halves! :lol:
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Re: The time has come... but I'm afraid.

Postby nelz » Tue Jul 29, 2014 2:27 pm

frozencow wrote:That sounds like a good idea! I personally own three computers, would it be worth dual-booting? Or should I have a computer dedicated to a Linux OS?


One dedicated to Linux, it's much easier thatn dual booting and saves buying a Raspberry Pi.

If you have already tried Ubuntu and liked it, just install that on one of your computers and start playing.
"Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." (Albert Einstein)
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Re: The time has come... but I'm afraid.

Postby frozencow » Tue Jul 29, 2014 3:00 pm

nelz wrote:
frozencow wrote:That sounds like a good idea! I personally own three computers, would it be worth dual-booting? Or should I have a computer dedicated to a Linux OS?


One dedicated to Linux, it's much easier thatn dual booting and saves buying a Raspberry Pi.

If you have already tried Ubuntu and liked it, just install that on one of your computers and start playing.


I'm so going to sprint home after work and do that.

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'Cause I've got a golden ticket!" :lol:
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Postby ajgreeny » Tue Jul 29, 2014 8:45 pm

Be aware; there are unfortunately, still a few applications that are strictly Windows only and for which there is no possible Linux alternative at the moment.

As an example, I had not used Windows for about 4 years, but then I got a TomTom stanav and guess what? It is possible to update it and its maps, etc etc in Windows only, it is not even seen when plugged in to my Xubuntu 12.04 box, so I have had to install my old Windows XP into VirtualBox and can update the TomTom with that. It is a real bore as I have almost forgotten how to use and administer Windows, and I certainly do not find it as intuitive as most people seem to, which only proves that there is nothing intuitive about computer OSs; it is just what you are used to that seems easy.
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Postby Ram » Tue Jul 29, 2014 8:57 pm

aj,

Exactly the reason I haven't bought a Garmin device. Though it runs linux you have to either be a mac or Windows user to use its software and that runs in a browser plugin.

Hey ho, money in my pocket.

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Postby frozencow » Tue Jul 29, 2014 10:24 pm

ajgreeny wrote:Be aware; there are unfortunately, still a few applications that are strictly Windows only and for which there is no possible Linux alternative at the moment.

As an example, I had not used Windows for about 4 years, but then I got a TomTom stanav and guess what? It is possible to update it and its maps, etc etc in Windows only, it is not even seen when plugged in to my Xubuntu 12.04 box, so I have had to install my old Windows XP into VirtualBox and can update the TomTom with that. It is a real bore as I have almost forgotten how to use and administer Windows, and I certainly do not find it as intuitive as most people seem to, which only proves that there is nothing intuitive about computer OSs; it is just what you are used to that seems easy.


Mm... I guess that is definitely something I have to consider...
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Postby nelz » Tue Jul 29, 2014 10:32 pm

Not while you are only using Linux on one of your computers, you can do such hardware-specific tasks on your Windows box.

For general usage, even if the specific programs from Windows are not available, there is usually an open source tool to do that same job. for the locked in proprietary stuff, a Windows system may still be useful.
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Postby wyliecoyoteuk » Wed Jul 30, 2014 5:41 pm

Well, I haven't used windows at home since Vista was launched.
I currently have a PC in the kitchen, which is used for web browsing and recipes, photo slideshows, etc, and doubles as a Media server backend with a dual HD tv tuner, runs Mythbuntu.
A workhorse PC upstairs, and my wife's Desktop PC both run Ubuntu.
in the living room, I use an Android TV box to stream TV and media via XBMC. We also have 2 Android tablets.
I administrate a mixed Windows Mac and Linux network at work every day.
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Postby GregS » Thu Jul 31, 2014 2:13 am

ajgreeny wrote:Be aware; there are unfortunately, still a few applications that are strictly Windows only and for which there is no possible Linux alternative at the moment.

As an example, I had not used Windows for about 4 years, but then I got a TomTom stanav and guess what? It is possible to update it and its maps, etc etc in Windows only, it is not even seen when plugged in to my Xubuntu 12.04 box, so I have had to install my old Windows XP into VirtualBox and can update the TomTom with that. It is a real bore as I have almost forgotten how to use and administer Windows, and I certainly do not find it as intuitive as most people seem to, which only proves that there is nothing intuitive about computer OSs; it is just what you are used to that seems easy.


Few enough, though.

I'm a pretty 'normal' home user; in addition to the usual office, financial management, graphics and media applications, plus a bit of 2D CAD, ALL of which are eminently satisfactory on my stand-alone (since the late 1990's) Linux install, the ONLY application I find I need to use the Windo$e VM install for, is, oddly, printing on printable CD/DVD!

I have looked and looked, and apart from a few tacky work-arounds there seem to be no native Linux applications to create and print CD/DVD labels...

Food for a future LXF how-to perhaps? Maybe someone knows of an obscure package? Feature for an *office component?
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Postby MadTux » Thu Jul 31, 2014 8:41 am

I remember, I started triple-booting with Windows XP, Ubuntu 12.04, and Mint 12. I was new to all three OSes, coming from an Apple family. I didn't really use Windows much at all, and went distro hopping for months (Would you believe I had a seven OS multiboot (with a seriously fscked up Grub menu :))?)

It definitely helped to have so many different distros to mess with, even if I ended up never using XP.
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